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    Cropping and resolution

    Another interesting article....but I think this aspect needs to take into consideration the intended use of the image...i.e if only for screen use then any image with more pixels than the screen is adequate....for printing you need to consider size of the paper and the dots per inch to work out the pixels needed

    Upscaling can help to provide the required pixels for any given application (if required for printing or viewing on a very hi-res large screen).... I upscaled this image having cropped it heavily to 2236 x1497 - that is just 3.3 megapixels....upscaled it to 4691x3307 that is 16 megapixels and successfully printed to A3. Before upscaling I would only get an image 7" wide at 300dpi....upscaling was adequate for A3 - 16" . Obviously the image quality would be better from an original higher resolution file than an upscaled one ....but this is adequate...in fact its really impressive when viewed on the wall. The upscaled version has also been accepted by Alamy image library.
    I wouldn't therefore dissuade anyone from using crop mode on the R6....but I would dissuade the purchase of an R6 if you only have EF-S lenses.....that would be a bad deal.
    20210616 Goldfinch by brianvickers, on Flickr (this ( (this one on flickr was further cropped for square format)

    I have an R6 and have cropped significantly, I'm tempted to use it in crop mode with my RF lenses when shooting birds (if I cant get close enough to fill the frame) as although that will not really give me more reach it will allow me to concentrate on the subject without the periphery that I'd normally crop off in post processing.





    Brian Vickers LRPS

    brianvickersphotography.com

    #2
    To me the skill in bird or for that matter any form of wildlife photography is to Know Your Subject, spend time observing the subject without the camera. Many birds and mammals are creatures of habit, they use the same tracks, the same perch, observation and field craft can allow you with skill to get close to your subject - far better than cropping. Personally I spend more time observing wildlife with a pair of binoculars than I do with the camera. My main interest is wildlife and conservation, not photography, photography is my medium for recording it.
    Sadly the birth of digital photography did nothing for our wildlife, hell to the wildlife the 'shot' is what matters. I meet no end of people out on the Heath armed to the hilt with gear, most can't identify the bird they are trying to photograph. It seems to be the 'in thing' at the moment, everyone's a wildlife photographer, but have very little or no knowledge of their subject
    I recall thirty years or so ago I went to the Shetlands Islands for three weeks armed with twelve rolls of Kodacrome film. I was considered abnormal if not mental - now everyone's doing it.
    Trev

    Equipment - According to the wife more than a Camera Shop got

    Flickr:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/trevb2639/

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      #3
      Trev makes an interesting point and it's something I can echo. My main interest is bird photography which came from being a bird watcher.
      Some people are more what I'd call bird spotters, once they see a bird (sometimes briefly) they have little interest in seeing it again. Like Trev my photography is a small part of the time I spend watching birds, the kestrels for instance I'll l spend 60-90 minutes and 2-3 minutes taking images.
      Spending time means I recognise a birds call, the way it flies, how it moves and its call. This means not I'm not only able to easily identify common species but recognise unusual species.
      More than 40 years ago (!) Orkney use to be my favourite place for photography and armed with my Olympus OM kit, 15 rolls of Ektachrome and 15 rolls of Kodachrome I'd spend many hours sat on cliff tops or in undergrowth.
      Canon 5D3, 7D2, 60D, Canon 70-200L f2.8 IS II, Canon 300 f4L IS, Canon 16-35 f4 L, Canon 24-105mm f/4L IS USM, Canon 1.4 MkIII extender, Sigma AF 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM, Sigma 150-600 Contemporary, Tamron SP AF 70-300 F/4-5.6 Di VC USD, Canon EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/16830751@N03/

      Comment


        #4
        Interesting point, Brian. What software did you use to upscale?
        I don't know if I'm the only one to be torn between R5 and R6. Having got a 7DII and getting mostly EF lenses with a view to FF later, the only area not covered would be WA (I use the 10-22). So with an R6 I agree I'd need a full frame WA lens. If I got the R5 I may not need to, but the R5 takes a lot of persuasion with the chief accountant in our house. Maybe have to see what the R7 looks like ... if one materialises..

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          #5
          I need to learn and experiment more with upscaling , wide angle at 8MP might be pushing it a bit far.
          I’m using affinity and dpp
          Brian Vickers LRPS

          brianvickersphotography.com

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            #6
            Trev is right. I observe sit under a tree or bush and the birds come to me. One lens, one camera and a bottle of water.

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              #7
              Looking at your image on my computer I see the difference. absolutely incredible detail. the full size print must be awesome. but your original Photo was that good.

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                #8
                The two issues here are 1) my original comment regarding cropping limitations in the article and 2)Trev's point regarding field craft (which I totally respect).....which no doubt goes a long way to mitigating the need for ever longer lenses and cropping.
                My original point was regarding the article - specifically what will provide an acceptable size image from which to crop and to consider the opportunity to upscale.....which I need to research further.
                Any experience and advice of upscaling would be of interest...

                (By the way, my closest encounter with wildlife and field craft claim....is that I once tickled a trout on the River Tern in Shropshire)
                Brian Vickers LRPS

                brianvickersphotography.com

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm no expert on wildlife photography but I do agree with the comments made regarding care for the environment and the wildlife in it. As to the image that Brian showed us and his comments, LOVE the image and the comments have made me think. Thanks Brian!
                  Last edited by SpringfieldPhoto; 04-07-2021, 03:21.
                  Alan

                  2 EOS 5D Mk IVs, EOS R6, EOS 3, Canon 20mm f2.8, Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art, Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art, Sigma 105mm f1.4 Art, Canon 85mm f1.8, Tamron 24-70 f2.8, Sigma 70-200 f2.8 OS Sport and Sigma 150mm f2.8 macro. Canon RF 24-105mm STM

                  http://www.springfield-photography.com/

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                    #10
                    Thanks All....just for the record I'm not an enthusiast bird watcher .....so I'm coming to this as a photographer. Other photographic genres hold my passion. I totally respect the environment...and spend most of my working days auditing the environmental management systems of organisations in energy and water utilities, engineering and manufacturing ....as an Internationally registered Lead Auditor of Environmental Management Systems...including compliance and proactivity in ecology and biodiversity....in doing so I make a positive contribution to those organisations in improving their environmental performance.
                    Brian Vickers LRPS

                    brianvickersphotography.com

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