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Bring your camera in they said...it'll be fun they said....

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    Bring your camera in they said...it'll be fun they said....

    I took these for my last employer: You know how it goes..."oh you've got a camera haven't you? Can you take a photo of the building" "oh...while you have your camera, we need some shots for the sales brochure"! Agreed as it was an afternoon playing with my camera Only caveat was that if they didn't like them, they would need to hire a professional"

    008 by SuperGeeman, on Flickr

    010 by SuperGeeman, on Flickr

    012 by SuperGeeman, on Flickr

    014 by SuperGeeman, on Flickr

    #2
    I believe food photography is a whole new ball game with shine, colour and (where appropriate) steam all have a part to play plus the chosen food needs to be perfect in colour shape and texture

    As a complete amateur in such matters I would suggest - The lamb needs shine and steam. The chocolate cake is a bit distracted by the orange flower. The croissant is however spot on !

    I bet this was an interesting afternoon and gave you a chance to look at something in a completely different light !
    Canon 5d mk iv plus the usual suspects ......

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bo_fo_to

    Comment


      #3
      Nicely shot, but as I used to do some food photography:
      • Always shoot against light backgrounds - it makes the food look more appealing.
      • Varnish, either sprayed or brushed if you want the thicker effect, is often used to good effect.
      • Dry ice hidden within the food gives the impression of hot steam.

      Hope that helps.
      Colin

      Comment


        #4
        Lovely photos, good enough to eat
        Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

        flickr

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by colin C View Post
          Nicely shot, but as I used to do some food photography:
          • Always shoot against light backgrounds - it makes the food look more appealing.
          • Varnish, either sprayed or brushed if you want the thicker effect, is often used to good effect.
          • Dry ice hidden within the food gives the impression of hot steam.

          Hope that helps.
          Colin, could you please expand on those 3 points, especially number 1.

          thanks

          Tom

          Comment


            #6
            Light Backgrounds:

            Unless you are going for something artistic/avant garde, light backgrounds allow the food to dominate the scene and make a more appealing image. If you look in food adverts or magazines, light backgrounds are used for that halo effect. There are exceptions of course, if I was shooting a "Devil Burger" with a hot chilli sauce, then that would cry out for a dark background.

            Varnish:

            By the time the food comes out of the oven, is placed perfectly on the plate, the lighting is re-arranged for that shot, the food is not quite at it's best. Therefore, vegetables get a light spray of varnish for a light fresh sheen. Gravy is varnish with some gravy granules mixed in and drizzled appropriately over the food. Ordinary gravy dries quickly under lights and there is nothing worse than the broken crusty effect of dried out gravy. Anything that needs a slight sheen to high gloss gets the varnish treatment, but no doubt there is a more modern equivalent now.

            Dry Ice:

            Food that is meant to be particularly hot, or particularly cold needs the dry ice treatment. The rising steam that would naturally occur doesn't last long enough for a food shoot and hot food needs to look piping hot, with an appropriate amount of steam. Dry ice hidden within the food allows the photographer to extend the apparent steam time almost indefinitely.

            Everything with food photography is designed to entice you, the viewer, to buy and eat that food. Clever lighting, appropriate backgrounds, varnish, dry ice, food dyes and airbrushing are all used to make that food look desirable and as perfect as possible. Unfortunately, that makes the modelled food inedible and the photographer doesn't get a free lunch afterward.
            Colin

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