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Are UV filters beneficial ? (+ poll)

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    Are UV filters beneficial ? (+ poll)

    I have always used Hoya pro1D UV filters in the past. So my question is are they beneficial.
    Do I buy them for my 'L' lenses or maybe not?

    1. They are harmless but serve as a protection for your lens. (beneficial)
    2. They do degrade the photo by some degree. (somewhat not beneficial)
    3. Something else (please specify)
    10
    They are harmless but serve as a protection for your lens. (beneficial)
    60.00%
    6
    They do degrade the photo by some degree. (somewhat not beneficial)
    40.00%
    4

    The poll is expired.

    Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

    Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

    flickr

    #2
    Providing you have a decent quality one, they shouldn't affect the quality of the image, and it's much cheaper to replace a filter than to have the front element of a decent lens replaced. Digital cameras are pretty much insensitive to UV light, unlike film so they are not needed. If you are purchasing a filter to protect the lens than a "Protect" is normally cheaper than UV - but many people used to have spare UV carried over from film. If you use a cheap UV then there is a good chance it will degrade the image in some cases significantly. There are some times when even a good UV or even a Protect filter will affect an image, off hand when imaging Aurora - you get "Newton Rings" showing up.

    Comment


      #3
      I was under the impression that my L lenses were not fully weather sealed until I added a filter. I have always used a good quality filter on all my lenses anyway from as far back as I can remember. Its cheaper to replace a damaged filter than a lens with a damaged front element. Great to have the forum back BTW. Regards, Ian W.

      Comment


        #4
        I have always used a good quality UV filter on my lenses. The peace of mind factor is incalculable ( given that I could calculate how much I've paid for the glass!)
        If I'm ever in a studio with a model where every eyelash matters I suppose I could always take the filter off but that's about as unlikely as finding unicorn eggs.
        Canon 5d mk iv plus the usual suspects ......

        https://www.flickr.com/photos/bo_fo_to

        Comment


          #5
          I have always used Hoya pro1D UV filters in the past and I think I'll order the Hoya brand again for my lenses.
          Thank you for the replies, appreciated.
          Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

          Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

          flickr

          Comment


            #6
            I used to use Hoya Pro UV filters as protectors, but always thought some shots were slightly soft.
            I recently purchased (with a friend) some lens calibration software (Reikan FoCal), and ran tests with and without the filters... The difference was very noticeable in that with the filters, the focus was off, and needed slightly more calibration... still looked wrong to me with filters, even after calibration.
            I have now removed the filters completely, and have re-calibrated - very happy with the results.
            I always have the correct lens hood on, which offers a good level of protection in my opinion.
            If I were to use a filter for protection, I would use a good quality clear filter, not UV, as these are not required for digital cameras.
            flickr
            5D4 : 7D2 : 16-35 f4 L : 24-105 II L : 70-200 f2.8 L : 100-400 II L : Macro 100 f2.8 L : Manfrotto CX055 Pro3

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by mikep View Post
              I used to use Hoya Pro UV filters as protectors, but always thought some shots were slightly soft.
              I recently purchased (with a friend) some lens calibration software (Reikan FoCal), and ran tests with and without the filters... The difference was very noticeable in that with the filters, the focus was off, and needed slightly more calibration... still looked wrong to me with filters, even after calibration.
              I have now removed the filters completely, and have re-calibrated - very happy with the results.
              I always have the correct lens hood on, which offers a good level of protection in my opinion.
              If I were to use a filter for protection, I would use a good quality clear filter, not UV, as these are not required for digital cameras.
              Thanks Mike, good to see you :thumbsup:
              Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

              Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

              flickr

              Comment


                #8
                I never use any filter when in the studio but outdoors I use Hoya HD Protector Filter. These are not UV as the camera sensor isn't sensitive to UV so totally pointless. Hoya introduced these filters for precisely this reason.
                Alan

                2 5D Mk IVs, EOS 3, Canon 20mm f2.8, Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art, Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art, Sigma 105mm f1.4 Art, Canon 85mm f1.4, Tamron 24-70 f2.8, Sigma 70-200 f2.8 OS Sport and Sigma 150mm f2.8 macro.

                http://www.springfield-photography.com/

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SpringfieldPhoto View Post
                  I never use any filter when in the studio but outdoors I use Hoya HD Protector Filter. These are not UV as the camera sensor isn't sensitive to UV so totally pointless. Hoya introduced these filters for precisely this reason.
                  Thank you for your reply, appreciated.
                  I have used Hoya Pro1 in the past.
                  Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

                  Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

                  flickr

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I have bought 3 x 77mm Hoya Pro1 protector filters & 1 x 67mm
                    Hoya Pro1 protector filter.
                    When I (eventually) go out with the camera I'll put it to the test.

                    Thanks everyone :thumbsup:
                    Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

                    Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

                    flickr

                    Comment


                      #11
                      No filter for me. I have never damaged a lens in any of the cameras I own and won't put a filter on them to protect a lens I don't break. I don't even own a UV filter for any of my cameras, both digital and film.
                      https://www.flickr.com/photos/23748789@N02/

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I seem to recall that Canon recommend a protection filter (clear optical glass) as part of their weatherproofing for L series lenses.
                        Colin

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thank you :thumbsup:
                          Canon 7D mkII, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

                          Please note: I do not have or use Photoshop

                          flickr

                          Comment

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