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    Saving work on DPP4

    Today I worked for about three hours to process about 70 RAW photos on DPP4, (I use a card reader). I tried to close the program and click the "yes in all" button that usually pops up, and save my work, but the program closed without saving adjustments on the card. Is there a way to save adjustments after finishing post processing of each RAW photo?
    Thanks,

    Vasilis
    Greece
    EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

    #2
    Re: Saving work on DPP4

    I hope this helps , after you edit your image /s , go to -File - in the top left corner , from that menu , you can choose save , save as , or convert and save , keep a note of , or change the destination folder so you know where they will end up on your P.C . If you have edited a few images a little paintbrush thing shows in the corner of the thumb nails and you can select all the edited thumb nails , and then do the same as above , it will save all those selected , but you have to confirm each one . Hope that helps and was clear enough for you .

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      #3
      Re: Saving work on DPP4

      Thank you, Lepus. I understood your suggestions. In fact, I thought I could safely leave the images on the memory card and after finishing the editing I could batch-convert to TIFF, as I have done in the past; however this time my PC (or DPP) let me down...
      EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

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        #4
        Re: Saving work on DPP4

        You can always choose to save them to your memory card when you save them , I am sure it was probably your P.C having a glitch , I am sure I have had similar happen to me in the past .

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Saving work on DPP4

          I found that by clicking File>Save, as you suggested, after processing of each photo is finished, does the trick. Many thanks for your help.

          May I ask one more question: Each thumbnail contains several icon marks arround the frame. The DPP manual makes no reference to these and their meaning. I think that the paintbrush means the image was processed, but what about the rest? Also, there is a tiny revolving figure (too small to tell what it shows) at the lower right corner of an opened photo. Do you happen to know what it signifies?
          Regards,
          Vasilis
          EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

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            #6
            Re: Saving work on DPP4

            Yes the paint brush icon , means you have edited it . The tiny revolving thing at the bottom of the opened photo , I believe is your P.C telling you to wait a minute as it`s still loading the image , that should disappear after a few seconds , and it`s best to wait till it does before you edit anything . I don't see many other icons around my thumbnails , other than the exposure settings and the letter R , which I assume is telling us its a raw file , a J will mean it`s a jpeg , along with the image number . If you give us an idea what the other icons you see are , I , or no doubt someone else might be able to explain them to you .

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Saving work on DPP4

              Vasilis, unless every one of those 70 images was shot in different circumstances and in different light, 3 hours seems an excessive amount of time. I would normally go through 200 to 300 images in around 30 minutes, often less.

              When I first started using DPP to process RAW images, I would treat every image individually and spend hours on the computer. One day by chance, I flicked the cursor over "EDIT" and half way down I noticed "COPY RECIPE" which I clicked. Having copied the recipe for that image, I went to the next image that was taken only seconds later > EDIT> PASTE RECIPE and hey presto, the changes I made to the first image appeared on the second image. I may take 20-50 images in a similar situation, in similar light, so I make the appropriate changes to the first image, copy recipe, highlight all similar images, paste recipe ............ job done. There are shortcuts and they are shown within the EDIT dropdown.

              If I have misunderstood what you are already doing and you are currently using this method, then I apologise for wasting your time, but no-one told me about this and when I found it out, it was a revelation and seriously reduced my workflow.
              Colin

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                #8
                Re: Saving work on DPP4

                Originally posted by colin C View Post
                Vasilis, unless every one of those 70 images was shot in different circumstances and in different light, 3 hours seems an excessive amount of time. I would normally go through 200 to 300 images in around 30 minutes, often less.

                When I first started using DPP to process RAW images, I would treat every image individually and spend hours on the computer. One day by chance, I flicked the cursor over "EDIT" and half way down I noticed "COPY RECIPE" which I clicked. Having copied the recipe for that image, I went to the next image that was taken only seconds later > EDIT> PASTE RECIPE and hey presto, the changes I made to the first image appeared on the second image. I may take 20-50 images in a similar situation, in similar light, so I make the appropriate changes to the first image, copy recipe, highlight all similar images, paste recipe ............ job done. There are shortcuts and they are shown within the EDIT dropdown.

                If I have misunderstood what you are already doing and you are currently using this method, then I apologise for wasting your time, but no-one told me about this and when I found it out, it was a revelation and seriously reduced my workflow.
                Another suggestion for you both , is you could also look into Batch processing , which if it`s the case your images are all very similar , would work even quicker than the copy and paste recipe method .

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Saving work on DPP4

                  you could also look into Batch processing ,
                  I have used that with some success, but generally, with a days shooting in different light and subjects, copy and paste works best.
                  Colin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Saving work on DPP4

                    Thank you Collin for your valuable advice. I had some idea about recipes, although I am not very familiar with this feature. However, in my case, this would not apply, as the 70+ photos were shot under varying lighting conditions and white balance settings. Conversion and saving into TIFF, I always do by batch processing if I have several images to process.

                    No problem with my time Colin; it was useful to read your suggestions which I noted.

                    Vasilis
                    Last edited by Epicuros; 30-10-2019, 06:40.
                    EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Saving work on DPP4

                      Screenshot.jpg

                      There is that round icon. I had seen the icon of a camera with an "X" on the right lower corner which I no longer see(?)...
                      You are right about that revolving thing; It takes some time to stop revolving, long after the image has loaded!
                      EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Saving work on DPP4

                        Originally posted by Epicuros View Post
                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]17483[/ATTACH]

                        There is that round icon. I had seen the icon of a camera with an "X" on the right lower corner which I no longer see(?)...
                        You are right about that revolving thing; It takes some time to stop revolving, long after the image has loaded!
                        The round icon signifies that lens aberration correction has been applied - I found it in the DPP4 manual.

                        Page 166 of this http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/030002...-0-w-im-en.pdf
                        John Liddle

                        Backwell, North Somerset - "Where the cider apples grow"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Saving work on DPP4

                          Thank you John. It makes sense, since I did not see any "pin cushion distortion", typical for the EF 24-105 Canon lens which I used throughout the photoshoot!

                          In fact, I have only read parts of the manual and this information was not part of my reading... Thanks again.
                          Vasilis
                          EOS 5D MK IV, EF 50/f1.4, EF 100/f2.8 Macro, EF20/f2.8, EF24-105/f4L IS, EF 100-400/f4.5-5.6 L IS, TS-E24/f3.5L, EF 75-300/f4-5.6, Canon Extender EF 2X II, Sigma 12-24mm/f4.4-5.6.

                          Comment

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